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Think Kidneys public awareness campaign

Despite being critical for life, many people in England do not know what kidneys do, where they are in the body, why we need them, how to keep them healthy and what happens when they go wrong. People generally know about their heart and lungs and how to keep them healthy by living a healthy lifestyle, but Think Kidneys research found people know very little, if anything about their kidneys. Thus, the NHS Think Kidneys programme is running a national campaign to raise awareness. Kidney disease causes suffering and changes lives and can often be avoided if diagnosed early.

The Think Kidneys campaign are highlight some key facts in their campaign, namely:

  1. Your kidneys
    • use about 25% of your energy and are the hardest working organs in your body
    • filter 180 litres of blood daily
    • produce about 1.5 litres of urine a day to get rid of toxins and waste products from the body.
  2. You can help your kidneys to work better by staying hydrated – drinking water, tea, coffee, soft drinks (not sugary), and some fluid comes from the food we eat.
  3. If you don’t drink enough your kidneys have to work even harder and if you are unwell you may have trouble taking enough fluid to stay hydrated and this could put your kidneys at risk by decreasing the effective blood flow to the kidneys.
  4. Kidneys also have role in removing drugs that many people take for common conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. If you are unwell and are unable to drink enough fluid this can put you kidneys under pressure and can cause damage. 

Dr Sarah Jarvis will also be talking about kidney health on the Jeremy Vine show on Monday 18 July at 1.00pm. GP surgeries and pharmacies across England will be displaying a series of posters to improve the awareness of kidneys, what they do and how to look after.

Michael Wise, kidney patient and member of the Think Kidneys team said: ‘I knew what the kidneys did but until I had kidney failure I didn’t know how important they were. I had complete failure which caused constant nausea, sleepiness, itchy skin, fatigue and a feeling of being unwell. Dialysis and a kidney transplant are wonderful but my life would be easier with my own kidneys’.

For any queries about the national programme and campaign, please contact:

E anniemtaylor331@gmail.com

T 07793 608 286 


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